Leigh Church of England Academy

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English

Our English is taught in ‘units of work’ inspired by and based on the following quality children’s texts.

 

Spring 1

Tom’s Midnight Garden - A graphic adaptation of the Philippa Pearce classic by Edith

 

Tom foresees a lonely summer spent with his aunt and uncle to avoid catching his brother’s measles. One night the grandfather clock in the hall strikes thirteen. This signals Tom’s entry into a beautiful garden where he meets Hatty. As their friendship develops, Tom becomes increasingly reluctant to leave the garden. Philippa Pearce’s classic novel has previously been adapted dramatically for theatre, film and television. Here it is given another parallel life – appropriately for a timeslip story – as a graphic novel adapted from the original by French artist Edith. The pictures evoke the 1950’s and Victorian settings without restricting the reader’s imagination, the dappled sunlight of the Victorian garden contrasting with the shade of the gloomy interior of the 1950’s house.

 

Overall learning aims of this teaching sequence:

  • To engage children with a story with which they will empathise
  • To explore themes and issues, and develop and sustain ideas through discussion
  • To develop creative responses to the text through drama, storytelling and artwork
  • To write in role in order to explore and develop empathy for characters
  • To write with confidence for real purposes and audiences

 

The main writing / speaking and listening outcomes of the unit are:

  • identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own
  • noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary
  • in writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed
  • selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning
  • in narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action
  • using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs
  • using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader

 

Writing Outcomes

  • Letter writing 
  • Documentary script writing
  • Poetry
  • Diary writing
  • Descriptive writing
  • Persuasive writing

 

Spring 2

Floodland by Marcus Sedgwick

 

Set in an all too believable near future when many parts of England are submerged in water and people drift into gangs, divided due to the scarcity of resources, especially food. Zoe has been left behind on an island which used to be the city of Norwich and discovers a boat which she wants to use to try and find her parents. She has to cope with human cruelties and frailties but the story ends on a note of hope. This is an exciting story which raises some key questions: How would people cope? How would they respond? What would happen to individuals, families, societies?

 

Overall learning aims of this teaching sequence:

  • To engage children with a story with which they will empathise
  • To explore themes and issues, and develop and sustain ideas through discussion
  • To develop creative responses to the text through drama, storytelling and artwork
  • To write in role in order to explore and develop empathy for characters
  • To write with confidence for real purposes and audiences

 

The main writing / speaking and listening outcomes of the unit are:

  • identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own;
  • noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary;
  • in writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed. Draft and write by:
  • selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning;
  • in narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action;
  • using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs;
  • using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader

 

Writing Outcomes

  • Letter writing
  • Writing in role
  • Poetry
  • Persuasive speeches
  • Free writing opportunities
  • Cross curricular writing opportunities

 

 

 

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